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  • Writer's pictureTrace Pirtle

Real Bread Week: Finding Spiritual Nourishment in the Bread of Life

Did you know that this week is "Real Bread Week"? For all who love fresh-baked bread, it is a time of communal celebration. But if the "bread of the world" nourishes our bodies, the "bread of life" nourishes our souls.



When I was a kid growing up in California, we would get fresh-baked sourdough bread from Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco. How the Boudins transformed simple flour, water, salt, and Mother dough into the best sourdough on the planet is known only to God. It brings a smile to my heart just writing about it.


But the world has changed. San Francisco has changed. In a world filled with fast-food chains and mass-produced loaves lining grocery store shelves, the essence of real bread often gets lost.


Real Bread Week and the Bread of Life


Real Bread Week, celebrated globally, serves as a reminder to reconnect with the simple pleasure and nutritional value of authentic, homemade bread. Did you know that sourdough bread is good for you? 


But beyond the physical sustenance, there's a deeper metaphorical resonance found in the idea of bread, particularly in the teachings of Jesus Christ.


Real Bread Week is not just about celebrating the art of bread-making; it's also an opportunity to reflect on the spiritual significance of bread, especially as it relates to the concept of the "Bread of Life" mentioned in the Bible. In the Gospel of John, Jesus declares,


"I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty" (John 6:35, NIV).

This profound statement by Jesus encapsulates the spiritual nourishment He offers to those who believe in Him. Just as bread sustains the body, Jesus sustains the soul, providing nourishment, sustenance, and salvation to those who seek Him.


During his ministry, Jesus used bread as a powerful symbol to convey spiritual truths. In the miraculous feeding of the five thousand (John 6:1-14), Jesus multiplied a few loaves of bread and fish to feed a multitude, demonstrating His power from Heaven and on earth.


For Christians, the act of breaking bread together holds significant meaning. It represents unity, fellowship, and communion with one another and with God.


In the Last Supper, we see the significance of bread in both literal and symbolic forms.


And He took bread, and when He had given thanks, He broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is My body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of Me" (Luke 22:19, ESV).

This simple act of sharing bread became the foundation of the Christian sacrament of communion, where believers partake of bread and wine, symbolizing the body and blood of Christ.


Real Bread Week serves as a timely reminder for Christians to reflect on the spiritual sustenance provided by Jesus, the Bread of Life.


Just as real bread requires careful attention, patience, and skill, nurturing our relationship with Christ demands intentional effort, prayer, and devotion. It's about seeking the true source of nourishment for our souls amidst the noise and distractions of the world.


Real Bread Week: Concluding Thoughts


As we celebrate Real Bread Week, let us not only indulge in the pleasure of freshly baked bread (preferably Sourdough!) but also take a moment to reflect on the deeper meaning behind this simple yet profound staple of life.


May we be reminded of Jesus' words:


"Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God" (Matthew 4:4, ESV).

In embracing the Bread of Life, we find fulfillment, purpose, and eternal nourishment for our souls.


So, as we knead and bake our bread this Real Bread Week, let us also feed upon the spiritual sustenance offered by Jesus Christ, the Bread of Life, and find true fulfillment in His abundant grace and love.


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About Me

Image of Dr. Trace Pirtle sitting on park bench identified as Jesus.

Greetings, I'm Trace!
I'm a retired counselor education professor who spent 35 years in the "helping professions." I'm a U.S. Air Force veteran who served as a Missile Launch Officer with I.C.B.M's during the Cold War (1980's). Today, I'm an "all-in" believer working full-time for our Lord Jesus Christ. I've included my personal testimony if you are interested. 
May God bless you beyond your wildest dreams!

In His Service,

Trace Pirtle

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